How to control the noise of vehicles?

Motorcycles with Straight Pipes, Boom Cars, Car Alarms, Semi Trucks with Engine Brakes, Off-Road Vehicles, Back-Up Alarms, Keyless Entry Sounds, Artificial Vehicle Sounds, Rumbler Sirens.
Mon Nov 02, 2015 11:09 am
Hi all

As my home is near to the roadside. Lots of noise comes at the morning and evening times due to the vehicles. I am facing too much problems as it creates lots of disturbance when i sleep or at the study time. If there is any solution to this please help me out.
Sat Nov 07, 2015 7:41 pm
The simple answer is to equip all vehicles with mufflers that meet strict requirements for controlling noise emissions, which is exactly what the law requires. The real question is why isn't the law enforced? When you have the answer to that question then you will understand why this is a fight against big money in politics. If you want muffler laws enforced again then you need to tell congress to re-establish funding for the Office of Noise Abatement and Control of the EPA and to strengthen the Federal Noise Control Act. Then you need to get local police departments to do there job and cite the violators of muffler laws.
https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-con ... /3384/text

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/STATUTE-86 ... Pg1234.pdf
Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:20 pm
I totally understand the frustration of living close to a busy road. I lived close to the main streets of Vienna, Austria for 2 years and it affected me a lot! I recently wrote an article about this issue on Greentumble. Feel free to check it out maybe it will help. In my case I had to move out...it was the best option. Here's the article location http://greentumble.com/why-noise-pollution-is-a-problem-and-5-ways-to-reduce-it/
Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:39 am
Your article says nothing about enforcing muffler laws, the single biggest preventable cause of noise pollution.
Mon Nov 30, 2015 6:26 pm
Nope, there is no solution. You can of course wear earplugs, but that won't solve the issue. You'll still get woke up, and you'll feel nervous about not hearing potential burglars or issues with family members who may need help in the middle of the night, if you live with any.

And get used to being treated as if YOU are the problem. Except in these forums, any time I complain about scumbags on extremely loud vehicles, people either laugh, scoff, or outwardly claim that I am the one with the problem. Besides a huge army of anti-social scumbags who get their rocks off ruining our lives, there are legions of idiots who think that's an A-OK thing for them to do.

Got your ears hurt by a Harley-riding slob because you had the audacity to have a window down while driving? Well, what's your problem that you don't want discomfort and literal hearing damage? What's wrong with you? Don't like losing 4+ hours of sleep every night when some scumbag decides it's time for you to get up? Too bad! They have rights! (Ruining your life seems to be one of them.) Land of the free!

Last night alone, I got woke up 3 times by a loud vehicle. Those are just the times I woke up fully enough to recall. The only reason I was able to get back to sleep at all is because I had drugged myself with 100 mg of diphenhydramine (a double dose).

Go ahead, call the police. If they're like in my area, they'll come out, then make you feel like an idiot for complaining, then do nothing further.

Embrace the misery!
Sun Dec 06, 2015 10:24 pm
Generally the best way to approach any noise problem is to learn the local noise regulations for where you live. For example, I live in Glendale, California. Here are the noise regulations for my city: http://www.qcode.us/codes/glendale/?vie ... i-8_36_030 (when you go to the link it's a bit confusing because it first goes to decibel measurement criteria, unless you have a familiarity with noise codes I would click the link just above it where it says "Article I. General Provisions" so you can get a general idea of how noise codes work.) When you read and understand your city noise regulations, the thing to do is see if your noise problem is covered by the regulations. And whether the noise problem you perceive is really a problem according to the code. If it is, then you can talk to your city leaders about remedying it and how to do it.
If you read your code and have any questions you can ask me if you like, I've dealt with noise codes for many years so I have some understanding of them. Or research your question online or by other means to clarify whatever you don't understand.
Sun Mar 27, 2016 6:10 pm
Greg Dahlen wrote:
Generally the best way to approach any noise problem is to learn the local noise regulations for where you live. For example, I live in Glendale, California. Here are the noise regulations for my city: http://www.qcode.us/codes/glendale/?vie ... i-8_36_030 (when you go to the link it's a bit confusing because it first goes to decibel measurement criteria, unless you have a familiarity with noise codes I would click the link just above it where it says "Article I. General Provisions" so you can get a general idea of how noise codes work.) When you read and understand your city noise regulations, the thing to do is see if your noise problem is covered by the regulations. And whether the noise problem you perceive is really a problem according to the code. If it is, then you can talk to your city leaders about remedying it and how to do it.
If you read your code and have any questions you can ask me if you like, I've dealt with noise codes for many years so I have some understanding of them. Or research your question online or by other means to clarify whatever you don't understand.


Greg,
It sounds like you know about codes but do you think it is fair to live somewhere your whole life and then have someone move in that is extremely noise any since a noise code doesn't exist there is nothing you can do about it? Do you think it is fair that noise can penetrate your house or private space disturbing you at all? Where do we draw this line on it being "a problem"? Society is not educated about the topic so it's not really a democratic vote issue. We either have to educate all of society, or we need regulation to protect our rights everywhere from this invasion of space.
Mon Sep 05, 2016 10:48 am
Good to know that useful info...
Wed Jun 14, 2017 7:12 am
And get used to being treated as if YOU are the problem. Except in these forums, any time I complain about scumbags on extremely loud vehicles, people either laugh, scoff, or outwardly claim that I am the one with the problem. Besides a huge army of anti-social scumbags who get their rocks off ruining our lives, there are legions of idiots who think that's an A-OK thing for them to do.
Wed Jun 14, 2017 7:15 am
Rock73 wrote:
And get used to being treated as if YOU are the problem. Except in these forums, any time I complain about scumbags on extremely loud vehicles, people either laugh, scoff, or outwardly claim that I am the one with the problem. Besides a huge army of anti-social scumbags who get their rocks off ruining our lives, there are legions of idiots who think that's an A-OK thing for them to do.


Had to listen to some loud jerk racing around the neighborhood a few minutes ago. It only gets worse because people don't speak up. I know for a fact that it bothers many people but they just don't speak up.

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